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Developing tadpoles have, once again, been discovered in the Loch Dam

Developing tadpoles have, once again, been discovered in the Loch Dam

A large number of developing tadpoles were discovered last week in Mount Hotham’s Loch Dam.

The tadpoles were seen along the water edge in the shallow water, with a few tadpoles also seen swimming into deeper parts of the dam.

This species is likely to be the native Alpine Tree Frog (Litoria verreauxii alpina), which is listed as Threatened in Victoria. This frog is a subspecies of the more widely distributed Litoria verreauxii.

The tadpoles were identified to be in a later stage of development and are likely to have completed their metamorphosis by the end of the month.

The Loch Dam holds Mount Hotham’s Class A recycled water, which is used for snowmaking during the winter season.  The water provides a deep constant source of water for the frogs to breed, with their eggs usually hatching within days of being laid. They have been known to propagate in the Loch Dam in warmer months in previous years.

The rocky terrain near the dam provides a suitable habitat for the species, which prefers to breed in deep water bodies.

One of the biggest conservation issues affecting the Alpine Tree Frog, and other frogs, is the spread if Chytridiomycosis.

07 March 2017